Faculty & Staff Resources

 

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The University of Oklahoma supports a diverse and inclusive faculty and staff. Through mindful hiring practices, the University strives to build a diverse group of faculty and an inclusive work climate for faculty to excel in teaching, research, and service.  


Faculty Development

Faculty Development is a part of the Office of Vice Provost and Academic Affairs and Faculty Development. Our goal is to provide resources and information for faculty career development and tools for teaching and learning that contribute to the OUHSC teaching, research, and service mission. 


Click here for more information.


Faculty Senate 

Composed of members of the Regular Faculty of the Health Sciences Center. Each college on the campus is represented in the Senate according to a formula defined in the Charter of the Regular Faculty and Faculty Senate. Election of members for three-year terms is by vote of the Regular Faculty of each college.

The Senate exercises legislative powers as delegated by the Regular Faculty and has the power to initiate any legislation requiring approval of the Board of Regents of the University.

Meetings of the Senate are typicallly held on the third Thursday of each month with the exception of March, when the meeting will be moved to the fourth Thursday if Spring Break falls on the regular schedule. There are no meetings in July and December.


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Staff Senate  

Composed of members of the OUHSC Staff from designated groups on campus. Senators and Alternates are elected annually from the constituents of their group.

The Senate exercises legislative powers as delegated by the Regular Faculty and has the power to initiate any legislation requiring approval of the Board of Regents of the University.

Meetings of the Senate are typically held on the third Thursday of each month with the exception of March, when the meeting will be moved to the fourth Thursday if Spring Break falls on the regular schedule. There are no meetings in July and December.

 Meetings of the Senate are typically held on the first Thursday of each month at 10:00 a.m. in the Bird Library Auditorium. Staff Senate meetings are open for all staff to attend.


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Green Zone 

OU Green Zone is a network of faculty and staff who volunteer to take the extra step to provide assistance for those students who served our country.


"OU deeply appreciates all that our veterans have done for our country and we want to give them the warmest possible welcome when they come home to OU." 

- OU President David L. Boren.


Faculty/Staff Green Zone Training

Once you have completed the Green Zone Training by watching the video below, please fill out our form to become an officially recognized OU Green Zone.


OU Green Zone Form



Green Zones on Campus

Faculty and staff have established Green Zones across campus. 

Top Ten Green Zone tips

      1. Realize veterans are nontraditional students, a special population of financially independent adults often juggling family, work, and studies. 
      2. Be aware that not all the veterans in your classroom are male. More women are serving, and are almost as likely as their male counterparts to have experienced firsthand traumas of war.  One in four veteran students are women. (Newbold & Balmer, 2012)
      3. Veterans generally possess discipline, structure, and a strong work ethic. Remember that the military teaches team connection and completion skills. 
      4. With some awareness and sensitivity on the instructor’s part, veteran life experiences become assets, adding to the diversity of perspectives represented in classrooms.  These life experiences can help both veterans and nonveterans gain a broader, more nuanced perspective on the world or class subject. (Kreuter, 2012)
      5. A secured classroom can provide veterans with feelings of safety.  Veterans may be sensitive to triggers such as surprises, loud noises, and chaos. Be cautious about images of injury, dismemberment and death, and provide advanced warning before displaying such images. (Newbold & Balmer, 2012)
      6. Veterans view the instructor as the leader of the classroom and typically respect decisiveness. Treat veterans as adults, as this is what they expect. Instructors should have effective classroom management policies in place. (Newbold & Balmer, 2012)
      7. Veterans may be reluctant to talk about their military experiences. Conversely, some may inadvertently dominate class discussions, in which cases boundaries for the nature and quantity of class participation need to be set, preferably in private, without calling the student out in front of the class.  Don’t try to relate to experiences that you don’t share – if you haven’t been in combat, don’t pretend that you understand what it or its aftermath is like. (Kreuter, 2012)
      8. Keep the syllabus (mission) clear with specific tasks and dates.  Be available for assistance and added support or referral.  Veterans may not easily admit when they are struggling. (Grasgreen, 2013)
      9. Understand that not everything in these Top Ten tips applies to every veteran.  They are all unique individuals with unique needs, and we do not want to engage in false assumptions about veterans.
      10. One example of how you can help is to use the resources provided on this page to refer veteran student to services on campus.  It is helpful to confirm that you are referring correctly by making a phone call before sending the student to the referral source.

References:

A New Generation of Leaders. (n.d.). The Mission Continues.

Balmer, T. D., (2012, November 30). Military Pride. Presentation at the Statewide Conference on Serving Student Veterans, Edmond, OK.

Boodman, S.G. (2011, November 28). Veterans find that their transition from combat to college can be difficultThe Washington Post: Health & Science.

Beuter, S. (2012, April 10). Vets Help Others Move From Combat to CollegeNational Public Radio.

Grasgreen, A. (2013, January 10). If You Build It, Will They Come? Inside Higher Ed. 

Griffin, K., & Gilbert C. (2012, April). Easing the Transition from Combat to Classroom: Preserving America’s Investment in Higher Education for Military Veterans Through Institutional Assessment (PDF). Center for American Progress. 

Kreuter, N. (2012, November 12). Veterans in the ClassroomInside Higher Ed, Tyro Tracts.

Newbold, L., & Balmer, T.D. (2012, November 30). Combat to College. Presentation at the Statewide Conference on Serving Student Veterans, Edmond, OK.

Sander, L. (2012, April 1). Veterans Journey From ‘Combat to College’ on a Maryland CampusThe Chronicle of Higher Education.

What It Is Like to Go to War, by Karl Marlantes. Atlantic Monthly Press, September 2012.